If you are unable to see the message below, click here to view.
Encore Header

Quarter 2, 2014


Encore's Top Stories

  1. Encore Interview: The Boss – Retired (Sort of)
  2. On March 1, 2014, Jim Rothman retired as President and CEO of PFS after 40 years of service.  We thought it would be good to take a short walk down memory lane with Jim to explore those 40 years.  During a grueling 30 minute grilling, Jim answered some probing questions.  We think you’ll find his answers interesting and entertaining. 

  3. PFS Welcomes a New Laboratory Tech
  4. PFS welcomes Kevin Klimecky as a Lab Tech. - Responsible for calibrations and a wide range of testing projects.

  5. PFS Corporation Welcomes Renee Moist
  6. The Northeast Region office of PFS Corporation proudly welcomes Renee Moist to its Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, office as a plans examiner and quality assurance auditor for modular home clients.

  7. Recognition for International Standards Work
  8. Dennis Newman, General Manager of PFS Information Technology, has been awarded the 2014 Distinguished Service Award by the Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM). 

  9. Jeremy Hopland - and the One That Didn't Get Away
  10. Jeremy Hopland, General Manager of PFS’s South Central Region, has been fishing for the Big Musky for 20 years - Here's a whopper of a story.



 

 


1. Encore Interview: The Boss - Retired (Sort of)

On March 1, 2014, Jim Rothman retired as President and CEO of PFS after 40 years of service.  We thought it would be good to take a short walk down memory lane with Jim to explore those 40 years.  During a grueling 30 minute interview, Jim answered some probing questions.  We think you’ll find his answers interesting and entertaining. 


Question:  What did you do before you joined PFS?
Answer:  Out of high school, I joined the Navy Submarine Service.  During the construction of the USS John Adams in Kittery, Maine, I learned the systems and procedures for running the nuclear reactor.  The USS Thresher was being finished next to the John Adams.  While the John Adams was being finished, the Thresher was lost at sea during deep dive exercises with the loss of 129 lives.  After that, the John Adams was put into dry dock and completely re-inspected.   Hundreds of discrepancies were found in critical welds because the steel hadn’t  been preheated before welding and re-heated after welding.  Anyway, after it was fixed and commissioned, I sailed around the world on her as a nuclear reactor operator.  (Note:  We at Encore believe that the Thresher tragedy and subsequent QC revelations on the John Adams were the genesis of Jim’s passion for quality, and rightly so!)

After the Navy, I went to the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee and got my engineering degree.  Out of college, I worked for Factory Mutual in northern Wisconsin as an auditor, monitoring maintenance schedules in heavy industrial plants. 

Question:  At that time, PFS was a very small company.  How did you find out about it?
Answer:  We wanted to move “south,” so I started looking at the employment ads in the Wisconsin State Journal.  I saw the ad for PFS and answered it.  I had an interview with Ed Starostovic, the owner.  I waited a week and called to see what was going on.  Ed told me I had the job.  I asked him why, and he said, “Because you followed up.”   Lesson learned!  I was hired as Staff Engineer in 1973.  Part of my agreement with Ed was to become a PE, so I had to take the EIT exam and then the PE exam after 4 years.

Question:  What other positions have you held at PFS?
Answer:  After Staff Engineer, I became Technical Director, VP of Operations, VP of Quality Control, Senior VP of QC, Executive VP, and finally President and CEO of the Corporation.

Question:  What was it like working at PFS back then?
Answer:  PFS was getting into the factory built housing industry as a third party.  Ed gave me a copy of the Uniform Building Code and told me I was a plan reviewer for factory built housing!    As a very small staff, everyone did everything!  The earliest incarnation of PFS had been as a non-profit part of the Douglas Fir Plywood Association (now APA) called Plywood Fabricator Service.   It provided quality monitoring service for manufacturers of plywood components for housing and other applications.   Ed bought the operation in 1972 and moved it from Tacoma, WA, to Madison.   By then, the company name had been changed to Product Fabrication Service to include the inspection and certification of more than just plywood components.  We had 7 employees at the time, about half of whom were inspectors out in the field.  Our Madison office was located on Midvale Boulevard by University Avenue. 

Question:  What changes have you seen at PFS?
Answer:  So that we could provide more services to more clients, we moved to an old school building on the Beltline in Madison. That building had more space, and Ed was able to move the testing lab from Tacoma to Madison. From there we moved to the building on Daniels Street in 1978, becoming a for-profit corporation and changing our name to PFS Corporation.  In 2007 we constructed our present facility in Cottage Grove.  We grew from 7 employees to about 80; we grew from a dozen clients to several hundred; and we grew sales by a factor of 30!   We have added many products to the original factory built structures business.  We now work with engineered wood products, structural insulated panels, concrete wall panels, overlaid hardwood plywood panels, formaldehyde emissions, hearth products, construction adhesives, and fire-tested products among many others.  In 1973, we offered Training Seminar #1 for our clients in the manufactured structures industry, both HUD Code and modular.  Last winter, we held Seminar #89!  In 1999 we formed an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) which bought PFS from Ed.  Now PFS is owned by its employees.  That was a big change.

 

Question:  You’ve been most heavily involved with the manufactured structures industry.  What changes have you seen?
Answer:  In 1974 President Ford signed the act that established HUD oversight of the “mobile home” industry.  Prior to that there was very little regulation of that industry, so manufacturers were free to build however they wanted, which was generally to an ANSI standard.  The HUD program went into effect in June, 1976.  The HUD program set standards for design and construction, and a key part of that program was the establishment of design review and construction quality assurance procedures overseen by independent third parties.  PFS was active with the National Council of States on Building Codes and Standards (NCSBCS) in setting the guidelines for the procedures;  PFS has been active with HUD, IBTS (NCSBCS successor), and the states ever since.  There were opportunities for companies to become nationally certified as third party design review and inspection agencies, and PFS took advantage of those opportunities.  In 1974, the states started seriously looking at requirements for construction of modular buildings.   Today, 38 states have modular programs, and PFS is certified to work with all 38 programs as well as the other jurisdictions which require local approvals.

We started with 3 or 4 manufacturers.  In 1973, even before any formal HUD or state programs were established, Wick Buildings in Marshfield, WI, became our first manufactured housing client.  We now service about 85 HUD and modular clients combined.

Question:  Even though you are “retired,” you still are active at PFS.  What is your role?
Answer:  I am still VP of Corporate Quality Control.  In that capacity, I review and sign off on ISO 17065 documents which guide some of PFS’s activities.   I sign and approve all product certification decisions.  Our staff does the product evaluation, and I review that work.  From time-to-time I still do engineering reviews for modular projects going to NC, SC, GA, FL, and IBC states.  I’m on our Board of Directors; I’m an ESOP trustee; I serve on our 401(k) advisory committee; and I am on our Quality Advisory Committee.   I also serve as chairman of the IBC Rules and Development Committee.

 

Question:  Outside of your role at PFS, what kinds of activities do you intend to pursue?
Answer:  I enjoy hunting, fishing and snowmobiling at our cabin in northern Wisconsin, and I enjoy golf with an occasional Leinies as warmer weather sports!   I will continue to work on German forestry practices on the land around the cabin.  Several years ago, I bought a portable sawmill.  I’m going to crank that thing up and cut my own lumber to make outdoor furniture as a hobby.  I’ll also be spending time at our home in Phoenix, again with the occasional Leinies playing golf and pickleball!

 

back to top




Kevin Klimecky
Kevin is from Lasing, MI, where he attended Lansing Community College and studied Chemistry and Fine Arts. Kevin gained laboratory experience while he interned for an R&D chemist at a Lansing specialty chemical manufacturer. Kevin pursued his artistic dream and graduated from Western Michigan University with a major in sculpture. He fell in love with the Badger and joined the Graduate Fine Arts School at UW Madison to further advance his passion in sculpture and to explore working in a new medium of hot glass.

PFS is happy to have Kevin as a Lab Tech responsible for calibrations and a wide range of testing projects.  We look forward to working with him in the coming months.

Kevin says, “What interested me about my current position at PFS is that it is the type of job that literally needs a ‘jack of all trades’ to see a project through from start to finish.  Also when I learned I would be in charge of the calibration of all the instruments, I new I would be using training I received in electronics as far back as high school. I am very happy to be here, learning the ropes from so many intelligent and nice people.”

When not at work, Kevin enjoys watching movies and going out to dinner and concerts.  He also hunts for great deals on collectable art and antiques, especially mid-century furniture and house wares.

Welcome to PFS, Kevin!

 

back to top



3. PFS Corporation Welcomes Renee Moist


Renee Moist
The Northeast Region office of PFS Corporation proudly welcomes Renee Moist to its Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, office as a plans examiner and quality assurance auditor for modular home clients.

Ms. Moist brings to PFS more than13 years of experience in the modular construction industry for both residential and commercial projects.

Prior to joining PFS, she worked as a director of engineering and quality control manager for 10 years at two custom modular manufacturers in the Northeast.

Renee oversaw the engineering and quality control personnel at those companies so that construction documents and quality control processes remained in conformance with state and local codes and regulations.

In addition to her engineering and quality control management background, she has 3 years experience as a project manager at an engineering consulting firm, conducting feasibility studies and reviewing custom modular home designs for clients. With her background and experience, Renee is well equipped to provide engineering and code consultation for PFS clients in plan evaluation and building inspection to verify code compliance.

“Renee is a welcome addition to the PFS staff, and she provides outstanding plan review service to our modular clients,” stated Rick Wenner, PFS Vice President of the Northeast Region.

Renee resides in Bloomsburg, PA, with her significant other. She has a 25 year-old daughter, Corey. Renee enjoys spending time remodeling her home, gardening, drawing, and raising her Labrador retrievers. 

Welcome aboard, Renee!

 

back to top



4. Dennis Newman Wins AIIM Distinguished Service Award


Dennis Newman, General Manager of PFS Information Technology, has been given the 2014 Distinguished Service Award by the Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM).  Dennis won the award because of his “…exemplary contribution to the information management industry and AIIM is admirable and deserving of wide recognition.”  Dennis’ efforts have been with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) relating to the establishment and maintenance of standards for Engineering PDF documents and Archiving PDF documents.  Since April, 2004, Dennis has been active in the AIIM-sponsored ISO technical advisory group (TAG) that oversees document management.  His main focus has been Working Group 7 on the PDF/E Standard (using PDF files in engineering), but he has also worked with the Archiving group and the General PDF file specification group.   Dennis was elected International Convenor to Working Group 7 in 2005 and Vice Chair of TC 171 (Technical Committee) in 2006, positions which he still maintains.

PFS electronic plan review utilizes PDF documents, and Dennis’ work with ISO keeps PFS and our clients at the forefront of developments in information management.

 

back to top



5. This One Didn't Get Away!


Jeremy Hopland, General Manager of PFS’s South Central Region, has been fishing for the Big Musky for 20 years!  He finally caught one, and his story appeared in the April/May 2014 issue of Musky Hunter  (www.muskyhunter.com), reprinted in its entirety below Jeremy’s photo.

Jeremy Hopland and his fish

 

Jeremy Hopland says he finally caught his “white whale.” It only took him more than 20 years of fishing in Wisconsin waters to do so.

Hopland, who is originally from Wisconsin but moved to Texas at a young age, has spent a week or two every year back in his home state in the hope of catching a 50-incher. On September 22 while fishing with longtime friend, Captain Kevin Stahl of Green Bay, Hopland connected with a 55 1⁄2-inch musky carrying a 24-inch girth while fishing on Green Bay of Lake Michigan.

The musky struck a Big Game Tackle Scuba Diver in the green perch color as it was trolled near an isolated weedbed on the end of a long point near Suamico as the two anglers fished in windy, postfrontal conditions.

“When Kevin suggested we try trolling, I was all for that, because after a full morning of trying to keep myself upright in those huge rollers my core muscles were worn out. I actually saw one guy fall in,” Hopland said. About 45 minutes later the fish struck.

“It was three or four minutes of me just standing there holding the rod in a death-grip and watching this fish do whatever she wanted to do. I’d be holding strong, then she’d make a run, then I hold strong, she’d make a run ... you get the picture.”

Once the fish neared the boat, Stahl noted the fish was barely-hooked; in fact, the hooks came out immediately in the net. After photos, the fish was released.

Then it was “high-fives, hugs, back-slaps, you name it. I was shaking all over!” Hopland said.

Hopland said he has ordered a replica mount from Lax Reproductions.

 

back to top


Copyright © 2013/2014  PFS Corporation, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you were on the address list of our  ENCORE newsletter - If you wish to be removed from our mailing list, Please send an email with the word REMOVE in the subject line to - Encore@PFSCorporation.Com
 
Our mailing address is:
PFS Corporation
1507 Matt Pass
Cottage Grove, Wi 53527